Natural Food Energy | Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes | In Make Your Own Soda, you’ll find the best Homemade Soda Syrup recipes for all-natural syrups with unique, artisanal flavors like pineapple, lemongrass, and hibiscus, as well as old-time favorites like ginger, sarsaparilla, grape. and More.

22 Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes From The Pantry

22 Amazing Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes From The Pantry

1. CHOCOLATE SYRUP

Reminiscent of your favorite sundae sauce, but better! A sip of soda made from this deep, dark, intense brew is like chomping down on a chocolate bar. Makes About 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ¼ vanilla bean, halved
  • 2 tablespoons chocolate husks
  • 3 tablespoons Scharffen Berger or other high-quality cocoa powder

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, and salt to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat. Scrape the seeds of the vanilla bean into the pan, toss in the pod, and add the chocolate husks (if using). Steep for 10 minutes.

Put the cocoa powder in a large bowl. Strain the steeped liquid through a fine-mesh strainer into the cocoa and whisk until smooth. Return the mixture to the saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Strain the mixture again, and then let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

CHOCOLATE PHOSPHATE

For one drink, fill a glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Chocolate Syrup and half a teaspoon of acid phosphate, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


2. VANILLA SYRUP

Like Torani, but better, because this syrup is all natural and  comes out of your own kitchen. Put the money you’ll save from not buying Starbucks into a jar and indulge in this inexpensive treat, Makes About 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 vanilla beans, halved

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Scrape the seeds of the vanilla beans into the pan and toss in the pods. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Store the syrup in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 14 days. Does not strain at this stage-leaving the pods in the syrup deepens the flavor. Strain before using.

BLUE BE RRY-YAN ILLA PHOSPHATE

For one drink, fill a glass with ice. Add 2 tablespoons of Blueberry Syrup, 1 tablespoon of the Vanilla Syrup, and half a teaspoon of acid phosphate. Top with seltzer and mix gently.


3. SARSAPARILLA SYRUP

Sarsaparilla, along with sassafras, is one of the main flavors in old-fashioned root beer.  Popular in the American West during the pioneer period, sarsaparilla-based drinks have become more of a novelty drink in the United States. In Louisiana Cajun country, people dry and grind the leaves of the sassafras tree to make file powder, an ingredient in gumbo, Makes About 2 ½ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1¾ cups sugar
  • 4 ounces dried sarsaparilla root
  • 1 ounce dried birch root
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan over high heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the sarsaparilla root, birch root, and salt. Steep for exactly 35 minutes. (If it steeps any longer, it will taste too woodsy, but steeped any less and it will be thin.) Strain immediately through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the roots, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

SARSAPARILLA SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Sarsaparilla Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


4. TOASTED ALMOND SYRUP

I love this syrup with hot drinks, and its slightly bitter, nutty flavor is a natural to pair with biscotti, fruit pastry, and hot cocoa, Makes About ¾ Cup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup blanched almonds
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 ½ cups boiling water

PREPARATION

Preheat the oven to 35O°F. Spread the almonds out on a baking sheet. Put the pan in the oven and toast the almonds, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Let cool slightly.

Combine the toasted almonds and the sugar in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until ground, but avoid making the nuts powdery. Put the mixture in a heatproof bowl and pour in the boiling water. Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved, then let cool. Cover the bowl and chill in the refrigerator overnight.

Strain the syrup through a clean piece of cheesecloth or a coffee filter. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

TOASTED ALMOND SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Toasted Almond Syrup, top with seltzer, and stir well.

CHOCOLATE ALMOND SODA

Like a liquid Hershey’s with Almonds, this soda is the perfect remedy when you’re thirsty and crave a sweet goody. For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 1 tablespoon of the Toasted Almond Syrup and 2 tablespoons of Chocolate Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


5. COFFEE SYRUP

At the intersection of gourmet soda and coffee culture lies Manhattan Soda Company’s Pure Espresso Coffee Soda, a thirst-quencher and pick-me-up that’s been popular since 1895. Cold brewed, with added chicory for smoothness, my coffee syrup is a nod to the venerable favorite. Make sure to use a dark roast, like French roast, for the fullest flavor. Makes About 1 Cup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ¼ cups water
  • 1 cup medium-grind coffee
  • ¾ cup caster sugar
  • ¼ cup chicory root

PREPARATION

In a very large bowl, combine the water, coffee, sugar, and chicory. Stir until well combined and transfer to the refrigerator. Steep for 24 hours.

Put a fine-mesh strainer over a large bowl and line it with cheesecloth or coffee filters. Slowly pour the liquid through the strainer. This is a slow process and will need to be done in small batches. Push the last of the liquid through with the back of a spoon. Pour the syrup into an airtight container and shake until the sugar is completely dissolved. Store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

COFFEE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Coffee Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

STEP IT UP

  • Add 2 tablespoons of the Coffee Syrup to a vanilla milkshake for a frozen mocha.

6. CREAM SODA SYRUP

Rich, full-bodied, and bursting with vanilla and caramel flavors, this syrup— along with lime, ginger, and hibiscus—is one of my most popular. In fact, its Martha Stewart’s favorite, too, as she told me when I first appeared on her show! MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 vanilla beans, split and scraped
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a small bowl, combine the water and lemon juice. Put the sugar in a heavy-bottomed pot with high sides, adding enough of the lemon water to make it look like wet sand, about ¼ cup. Cover the pot and bring the sugar to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, without stirring, until the sugar turns a dark amber color; look for a temperature of 28o°F to 3OO°F on a candy thermometer.

Remove the pot from the heat and let cool for 5 minutes. Slowly and carefully, pour in the rest of the lemon water. Add the vanilla beans and salt, stir well, and bring the mixture to a simmer. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Transfer to an airtight container and store in the refrigerator with the vanilla beans still in the liquid. Store the syrup in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

CREAM SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add a few dashes of lactic acid and 3 tablespoons of the Cream Soda Syrup. Top with seltzer and mix gently.

STEP IT UP

  • For perfect caramel, keep a close eye on the pot, as sugar burns easily.
  • The vanilla beans can be removed the next day or left in to extract more flavor.

7. BOILED APPLE SYRUP

This recipe is basically a technique for a reduction, which produces a concentrated flavor that’s never watered down. The syrup is very appley, perfect on its own, but also great if you add spices like nutmeg and clove, Makes About 2 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • ½ gallon fresh apple juice
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the juice and salt to a simmer, but not a boil. Cook slowly until the juice is reduced by half, about 1 hour. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

APPLE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Boiled Apple Syrup. Top with seltzer and mix gently.

STEP IT UP

  • Stir in 2 tablespoons of dark rum and 1 tablespoon of maple syrup for an autumn cocktail.

8. DRIED APRICOT AND BURDOCK SYRUP

The root of the burdock plant has been used in brewing beverages since medieval times, enjoying a starring role in hedgerow mead, an early relative of beer. Its chosen as an ingredient for its bitter flavor, which helps achieve balance in this soda syrup, the way that hops are used in modern-day beer to add an earthy element to the taste, Makes About 1 ½ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 5 ounces dried apricots, cut into quarters
  • 1teaspoon dried burdock root, in a tea bag or tied into a piece of cheesecloth
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Put the dried apricots, burdock, and salt into a large heatproof bowl. Pour the hot liquid over the fruit and root, and steep for 20 minutes. Remove the burdock, let the mixture cool, store in a lidded container, and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, strain the syrup through a fine- mesh strainer, using a large spoon to force as much liquid as possible from the apricots; discard the apricots. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

DRIED APRICOT AND BURDOCK SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Dried Apricot and Burdock Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


9. LAVENDER GOLDEN RAISIN SYRUP

Fragrant, but never perfumey, the floral aroma and honeyed sweetness of this syrup bring to mind picnics in Provence.  The fruitiness of the golden raisins ensures that the lavender isn’t overwhelming, instead allowing it to provide a soft finish, Makes 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons golden raisins
  • ¼ teaspoon dried lavender
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the raisins, lavender, and salt. Steep for 1 hour.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, pushing firmly on the raisins with the back of a large spoon to remove as much liquid as possible; discard the raisins. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

LAVENDER GOLDEN RAISIN SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Lavender Golden Raisin Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently. If you like, garnish with food-grade lavender.


10. SPICED MAPLE SYRUP

The warming spices of winter conjure up thoughts of mulled wine and spiced cider drunk in the crisp breezes of the season. Add a dash to hard cider for a convivial evening warmer. This winning basic syrup can be blended with spirits for toddies or added to coffees and to drinking chocolate. Makes About 1 Cup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 6 all spice berries
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 1 cardamom pod
  • 1 cup maple syrup (Dark amber Grade B is best)

PREPARATION

In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan set over high heat, combine the cinnamon stick, allspice, cloves, and cardamom. Toast the spices, pushing them around with a wooden spoon so that they don’t burn, for 3 minutes or until they become fragrant. Add the maple syrup and bring the mixture to a light simmer. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool. Chill the syrup overnight in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

The next day, strain the syrup through a fine- mesh strainer and discard the spices. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

MAPLE-APPLE SPARKLER

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 2 tablespoons of Boiled Apple Syrup, 1 tablespoon of the Spiced Maple Syrup, and a dash of acid phosphate. Top with seltzer, mix gently, and garnish with a cinnamon stick.


11. CHAMOMILE SYRUP

Made from the chamomile plant, purported to have calming qualities, this versatile syrup lends its herbal flavor to cold sodas, but could also be stirred into hot water for a soothing nighttime beverage. For a more surprising and exotic version, substitute grapefruit zest for lemon, Makes About 1 ¼ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons dried or fresh chamomile
  • 2 pieces lemon zest
  • ¼ teaspoon citric acid solution

PREPARATION

In a small saucepan “set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, and salt to a simmer. Add the chamomile, lemon zest, and citric acid, and steep for 20 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

CHAMOMILE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Chamomile Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

CHAMOMILE GRAPEFRUIT SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Squeeze in the juice of half a lemon. Add 1 tablespoon of the Chamomile Syrup and 2 tablespoons of Grapefruit Syrup. Top with seltzer and mix gently.


12. HIBISCUS SYRUP

When I vend icy-cold sodas at The New Amsterdam Market in New York City, I  find  more  return  customers  looking for hibiscus  soda  than  for  any other  flavor.  An edible flower, hibiscus packs a concentrated flavor punch when dried and used as an ingredient in home-brewed drinks.

With a nice, almost dry tartness that hints at lemon and a dazzling ruby-magenta color, hibiscus makes a fragrant and punchy tea. When rounded out with a sweetener, hibiscus is a surprising and delightful base for a great sparkling drink. The sugar and agave balance that, and the ginger adds a little heat. A friend of mine adds a dash of this to prosecco, her version of the French drink Kir Royale. Makes About 1 ¼ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup fresh lime juice
  • ⅓ Cup light agave nectar
  • ½ tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, lime juice, and agave to a simmer. Add the ginger and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and add the hibiscus flowers. Steep for 20 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discarding the flowers, and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

HIBISCUS SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Squeeze in the juice of half a lime. Add 3 tablespoons of the Hibiscus Syrup, top with seltzer, and stir.


13. ROSE SYRUP

The essence of rose is used throughout the world to flavor and perfume teas, desserts, and dairy drinks.  I use both rose petals and rose hips for a nice floral aroma with depth. A complicated and sometimes acquired taste, Rose Syrup makes a lovely soda. You can also tip it into lemonade to conjure up the exotic cuisines of Lebanon and Israel. You can find food-grade rose petals at wholesale herb companies, at specialty tea stores, and on the Internet. Make About 1 Cup

INGREDIENTS

  • ¾ cup water
  • ½ sugar
  • 1 ounce rose hips, coarsely chopped
  • ½ ounce organic, food-grade rose petals

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a simmer. Add the rose hips and petals, and remove the pan from the heat. Steep for 20 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

ROSE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Rose Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


14. HRISTIA’S ROSE

I created this drink for my friends Hristo and Tia as a wedding present. Bottles of this flavored syrup—with  a ribbon  tied  on  and  a label that my  wife, Erica, a graphic artist, designed—were presented  to  celebrants as they  left. Tia wanted a flavor with a floral note, and Hristo requested something deep and rich. I combined the two and came up with this drink. Makes 1 Drink

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 tablespoons Dried Cherry Syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon citric acid solution
  • Seltzer
  • 2 drops Rose Syrup

PREPARATION

Fill a tall glass with ice. Add the cherry syrup and citric acid. Pour in cold seltzer and mix gently. Add a couple of drops of the rose syrup and serve.


15. LUCY AND RICKY RICKEY

Each distinct and appealing alone, but made better as a team, hibiscus and lime are the Lucy and Ricky of the soda-syrup world.  Makes 1 Drink

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons Hibiscus Syrup
  • 2 tablespoons Lime Syrup
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon acid phosphate or citric acid solution
  • Seltzer
  • Maraschino cherry, for garnish
  • Lime wheel, for garnish

PREPARATION

Fill a tall glass with ice. Pour in the hibiscus and lime syrups, lime juice, and acid phosphate. Add cold seltzer almost to the top of the glass, and mix gently. Garnish with the cherry and lime wheel.


16. ORGEAT SYRUP

Relatively clear in the bottle, this predominantly almond flavored syrup turns milky when added to water or seltzer. Like vinaigrette, the liquid is an emulsion, which means it is a mixture of two substances that cannot fully blend—in this case, nut oil and water.

Often called “French barley water,” it dates back to a time when a barley-almond mixture was its base; the flavoring is still popular throughout Europe, used in sparkling water and coffee. As a base for classic cocktails, Orgeat is a component in the Mai Tai and Planter’s Punch, Makes About 2 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • ¾ cup   blanched almonds
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 thin piece orange zest (about the size of your thumb)
  • 1 ½ cups boiling water
  • 1 scant drop orange blossom water

PREPARATION

Combine the almonds and sugar in the bowl of a food processor and process until the nuts are coarsely chopped. Transfer the mixture to a heat proof bowl, add the orange zest, and pour in the boiling water. Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. Cover the bowl and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, strain the syrup through cheese­ cloth or a coffee filter. Stir in the orange blossom water thoroughly. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

ALMOND ORAHGE SODA

For one drink, fill a glass with ice. Add 2 tablespoons of Seville Orange Syrup and 1 tablespoon of the Orgeat Syrup. Top with seltzer and garnish with an orange wheel.


17. DRIED CHERRY SYRUP

Dried cherries make a sublime soda, and its fun to try making this syrup with a few different varieties. Here, I call for plump dried dark sweet cherries. You can also use dried tart red cherries, and the flavor will be a little different. When you make soda, experiment with citric acid or acid phosphate—the more you add, the brighter the flavor will be. Makes About 2 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ¾ cup dried sweet cherries

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, and dried cherries to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and steep for 2 hours.

Using a stick blender, break up the cherries until the mixture is chunky (don’t blend it smooth). If you don’t have a stick blender, you can use a fork or potato masher to smash them. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the cherries, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

CHERRY SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Dried Cherry Syrup and a few dashes of citric acid solution or acid phosphate. Top with seltzer and mix gently.


18. LOVAGE SYRUP

Many people have asked me, “What does lovage taste like?” When I tell them the flavor closely resembles celery, they usually seem unsure how to take that.  Lovage is an herb. Its leaves are often used in salads, and the root can be eaten as a vegetable. Widely used in kitchens all over the world, lovage has also become popular as an addition to cocktails in bars and restaurants, and it’s now fairly easy to find through wholesale herb companies, on the Internet, and in stores stocking bulk herbs and teas. It’s a natural as a flavor in cocktails. The Modern, the restaurant in the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City, serves a traditional Negroni made with lovage syrup. As you might imagine, the syrup is also a nice addition to a Bloody Mary. Makes About 2 ½ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ¾ cups sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon dried lovage root
  • ½ tablespoon dried lovage leaf
  • Juice of 1 lemon

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, and salt to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the lovage root and leaf. Steep for about 45 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Add the lemon juice and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

LOVAGE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Lovage Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


19. GINGER RAISIN SHRUB SYRUP

The spicy warmth of ginger marries beautifully with the honeyed-syrup flavor of the golden raisins in this recipe. Blended with the tart and fruity apple cider vinegar, this syrup pops when added to seltzer, blooming into a tangy and fresh soda unlike any commercially bottled drink. Pair this soda with a corned beef on rye with mustard or a feta-topped salad, Makes About 2 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup water
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ¼ cup golden raisins
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the vinegar, water, sugar, and salt to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the raisins and ginger. Cover the pan and steep at room temperature for 24 hours.

The next day, smash the raisins with a fork or potato masher. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

GINGER RAISIN SHRUB

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Ginger Raisin Shrub Syrup, top with seltzer, and stir.


20. BLUEBERRY AND STAR ANISE SHRUB SYRUP

All shrubs are considered to have health-boosting properties, but this one offers an extra jolt from exotic star anise. With a flavor familiar to many from the liqueurs Galliano and Sambuca, star anise is also widely used in Chinese cuisine, as an ingredient in five-spice powder, and in Indian cooking, as a major component of the spice blend garam masala.

In traditional Asian medicine, it s considered a warming spice and is useful in curing colds; today, one of its chemical elements (shikimic acid) is used in the over-the-counter influenza remedy Tamiflu. Here, the sweet, ripe fullness of the blueberries balances out the strong, one-note licorice taste of the star anise, resulting in a smooth, fresh-tasting soda with just a hint of herb, Makes About 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 ½ cups fresh blueberries
  • ¾ cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 star anise

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Put the blueberries, vinegar, and star anise in a large heatproof bowl. Pour the boiling liquid over the ingredients in the bowl, cover, and steep for 20 minutes.

Carefully mash the blueberries with a fork or potato masher and let cool. Transfer the mixture, covered, to the refrigerator and chill for 2 days to allow the flavors to blend before use.

When ready to use, strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

BLUEBERRY AND STAR ANISE SHRUB

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Blueberry and Star Anise Shrub Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

SHRUBS

Ari old-school type of drink, the shrub is a vinegar based beverage that is usually lightly sweetened and flavored with fruit. Vinegar drinks have long been drunk for health reasons. As early as 400 b.c., ancient Greeks were quaffing natural apple cider vinegar sweetened with honey to cure everything from lethargy to sallow skin. Modern shrubs have enough vinegar to taste tart and are never cloyingly sweet, so you can drink them without worrying about consuming a lot of sugar. In colonial times, settlers spiked them with brandy or rum. Today, shrubs can be found on upscale, fashionable restaurant menus.

easy-soda-syrup-recipes

21. RASPBERRY-DRIED APRICOT SHRUB SYRUP

Apricot and raspberry are two fruits that go hand in hand as a flavor combo. Apricots rich sweetness and the tangy zing of raspberries are often com­bined to make jams, sauces, salad dressings, baked goods, and even sangria. For this syrup, the mildly spicy pink peppercorns—exotic, but never over the top—bring out the flavor of the fruits, the way black pepper enhances already-present tastes, Makes About 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 ¼ cups fresh raspberries
  • ½ cup dried apricots, halved
  • ¾ cup   champagne vinegar
  • 10 pink peppercorns

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, sugar, and salt to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and add the raspberries, apricots, vinegar, and peppercorns. Cover the pan and steep at room temperature for 24 hours.

The next day, smash the raspberries and apricots with a fork or potato masher. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

RASPBERRY-DRIED APRICOT SHRUB

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Raspberry-Dried Apricot Shrub Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


22. DRIED FIG SHRUB SYRUP

Sweet and succulent, figs are considered one of the oldest cultivated fruit crops on record, along with olives and grapes, and they enjoy popularity from the Middle East, to the Mediterranean, to the United States. If you find fresh figs at your gourmet food market or specialty store, go ahead and substitute them for dried, but double the amount. Serve this soda with a platter of mixed olives and goat cheese. The strong, salty tastes will complement the fig and vinegar flavors, Makes About 3 Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar
  • 8 dried figs cut in half
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 4 whole cloves

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Put the vinegar, figs, cinnamon stick, and cloves in a large heatproof bowl. Carefully pour the boiling liquid over the figs and spices. Cover the bowl and let cool. Refrigerate for 2 days to allow the flavors to blend.

When you’re ready to use, strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

DRIED FIG SHRUB

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Dried Fig Shrub Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


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