Natural Food Energy | Mushroom Nutrients, Health benefits, and few easy Mushroom Recipes. Brimming with the anti-aging antioxidants vitamin E and selenium, mushrooms help to maintain healthy skin and hair health.

Mushroom

These highly-prized fungi have been revered and valued by ancient peoples for thousands of years, both as tasty food and potent medicine. They supply key nutrients to prevent high cholesterol and stimulate the immune system with their powerful disease-fighting capabilities.

There are many species of mushrooms available today in supermarkets. Among the more common ones are the button, chestnut, and Portobello mushrooms, but all species are packed with health-giving nutrients. Made up of between 80 and 90 percent water, they are very low in calories and are therefore a useful food for dieters.

Mushrooms are one of the richest sources of a powerful antioxidant called L-ergothioneine, which combats cell damage. Research is being done into their cancer-fighting properties, including reducing the risk of breast cancer. And their minerals may ease the pain of arthritis.

Mushrooms may also help to slow down age-related muscle loss, as they provide protein in a form that the body can easily use.

All mushrooms nutrients are high in B-vitamins, particularly vitamin B3, which may slow the onset of age-related dementias. They are a rich source of potassium, which helps to regulate blood pressure one average Portobello mushroom contains more potassium than a banana.

Mushrooms are also an important source of vitamin B12 for vegetarians, which is vital for maintaining healthy energy levels and combating arthritis.

Brimming with the anti-aging antioxidants vitamin E and selenium, mushrooms help to maintain healthy skin and hair and protect against heart disease. The fungi are a slow-release energy food, thanks to their high content of vegetable protein.

They’re also especially rich in chromium, which helps to stabilize blood-sugar levels and, in turn, helps to control sugar cravings. The older you are, the less likely you are to be taking in enough chromium.

Shiitake mushroom: Native to China, Japan and Korea, shiitake mush­ rooms have been used in those countries for thousands of years to prevent and treat illness.

In ancient China, they were prescribed by physicians to help to beat a range of conditions, from colds and flu to gastrointestinal problems. Recently, these mushrooms have been the subject of several studies that are researching their pro-immunity and healing powers.

These fungi contain lentinan, a compound that has been shown to help lower cholesterol. Lentinan has also been isolated and licensed as an anti-cancer drug in Japan because of its ability to stimulate the immune system to deactivate malignant cells.

lentinan is understood to trigger the production of the antiviral and anti-bacterial substance interferon, which may help to inhibit the progress of the HIV virus as well as treat cancer, diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibrocystic breast disease.

The mushroom nutrients are also rich in the amino acids that enhance general immune function. They contain eritadenine, a digestive enzyme that is thought to lower cholesterol, while their tyrosinase lowers blood pressure. They are also rich in iron, which staves off anemia.

Although shiitake mushrooms are more expensive than many other varieties, a small amount gives great health benefits and satisfies the ap­ petite. They can be bought fresh, pickled or dried, and can be used in dishes in the same way as ordinary field mushrooms.

Maitake Mushroom

Another type of fungus from the Far East with ex­cellent healing powers is the maitake mushroom. Maitake mushrooms contain beta-glucan, which stops the HIV virus from killing white blood cells, possibly preventing AIDS. Beta-glucan is known to be highly effec­tive in shrinking cancerous tumors. Maitake mushrooms are also used to treat high blood pressurg and liver disease.

Reishi Mushroom

This fungus is used in extract or essence form as a treatment for liver disorders, hypertension and arthritis. Studies have shown that it has antiviral, antibacterial, antioxidant anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties, and scentists believe that it helps to fight tumors. In addition, the reishi mushroom is used to combat high blood pressure and asthma.

Mushroom Nutrients

Mushroom-Nutrients-Benefits-Recipes-natural-food-energy

Mushroom Nutrients | Vitamins: B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, E, folic acid; calcium, chromium, COPPER, IRON, MAGNESIUM, MANGANESE, PHOSPHOROUS, POTASSIUM, selenium, zinc; lentinan; L-ergothioneine; eritadenine; beta-glucan; protein; omega-6 essential fatty acids,

17 Health Benefits Of Mushroom

  1. ANTI-BACTERIAL
  2. ANTIVIRAL
  3. ANTIOXIDANT
  4. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY
  5. ANTI-AGING
  6. ANTI-CANCER
  7. DETOXIFYING
  8. BLOOD-SUGAR BALANCING
  9. ENERGY-BOOSTING
  10. GOOD FOR THE BRAIN
  11. GOOD FOR HAIR, TEETH AND NAILS
  12. GOOD FOR THE SKIN
  13. GOOD FOR THE EYES
  14. GOOD FOR THE HEART
  15. GOOD FOR THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
  16. GOOD FOR THE MUSCULO-SKELETAL SYSTEM
  17. GOOD FOR THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

Mushroom Recipes

GLAZED SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS

  • 450g/ 1lb shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 tsp rapeseed oil
  • 80ml/ 2 ½ fl oz/ ⅓ cup chicken stock
  • 1 tsp cornflour
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp dry sherry

Discard the shiitake stalks and slice the mushrooms. In a large pan, heat the oil and add the mushrooms and 2 tablespoonfuls of the stock. Cook, stirring often, for 5-6 minutes. In a small bowl, dissolve the cornflour in the remaining stock. Stir in the soy sauce and sherry. Add the mixture to the pan. Cook for 2 minutes, or until the mushrooms are glazed.

MUSHROOM PATE

  • 375g/ 13oz chestnut mushrooms, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 200g/ 7oz mascarpone cheese
  • 2 tbsp chopped tarragon

In a pan, fry the mushrooms in the oil for 2 minutes. Add 4 tablespoons of water and simmer for 10 minutes. Allow to cool, then drain and puree in a blender. Stir in the remaining ingredients. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour, and then serve.

SHIITAKE NOODLES

  • 250g/ 9 oz thick egg noodles
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • I tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 small red chillies, deseeded and sliced
  • 200g/ 7oz firm tofu, diced
  • 5cm/ 2in piece root ginger, peeled and grated
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 150g/ 5 ½ oz shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 6 spring onions, trimmed and chopped

Cover the noodles in boiling water and leave to soften for 5 minutes. Drain. In a bowl, mix together the soy sauce, oyster sauce and sugar. Heat the oil in a wok. Stir-fry the chillies, tofu, ginger and garlic for 2 minutes, and then add the noodles, mushrooms, sauce mixture and spring onions. Toss and serve immediately.

FRIED SHIITAKE MUSHROOM SALAD

  • 3 large handfuls mixed salad leaves
  • 1 bunch watercress, trimmed
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 450g/ 1lb shiitake mushrooms stalks removed and caps sliced
  • 8 garlic cloves, crushed
  • ground black pepper

Put the salad leaves and watercress in a bowl. Heat 3 tablespoons of the oil in a pan and sauté the mushrooms and garlic until tender. Add the contents of the pan to the salad with the remaining oil. Toss well, season with black pepper and serve.

STUFFED MUSHROOMS

  • 4 large mushrooms
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 spring onions, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and finely chopped
  • 2 small courgettes, chopped
  • 8 green olives, pitted and chopped
  • 2 tbsp porridge oats
  • 1 tbsp chopped basil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • Salad leaves, to serve

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/ gas mark 4. Remove the stalks of the mushrooms. Heat the oil in a pan and gently fry the spring onions, pepper, courgettes, olives and oats for 3 minutes. Stir in the basil and soy sauce. Place the mushrooms on a baking tray and spoon the mixture over them. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Serve on a bed of salad.

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