Natural Food Energy | Best Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes | you’ll get great ways to homemade soda syrup recipes. To create soda fountain classics with all-natural foods.

21 Best Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes

21 Best Homemade Soda Syrup Recipes

1. Grapefruit Syrup

Tart and tangy, the flavor of grapefruit wakes the senses, and a soda made with this syrup is wonderful served as a bright, eye-opening breakfast treat. I like to balance the flavor with a little sugar and a small amount of salt to make a refreshing  soda that tastes sunny  and  sophisticated Makes about 2½ Cups,

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups of water
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • Zest of 2 grapefruits
  • ¾ cup fresh grapefruit juice

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, salt, and sugar to a boil. Add the zest and remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan and steep for 20 minutes.

Add the juice to the pan and stir. Strain the syrup through a clean piece of cheesecloth and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

GRAPEFRUIT SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add,3 tablespoons of the Grapefruit Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


2. SEVILLE ORANGE SYRUP

Also known as a sour orange or a bitter orange, the Seville orange is traditionally used in marmalade. The thick, deeply colored peel is valued for its fragrant oil, used widely in perfumes. When tempered with sweetness, the bold flavor of this exotic citrus fruit is amazing. Sodas made with this syrup are definitely not Fanta Orange, Makes about 2 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • Zest of 4 Seville oranges
  • ½ cup fresh orange juice (if not making a phosphate)

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Turn off the heat, add the zest, cover the pan, and steep for 30 minutes. Add the orange juice and stir, strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

SEVILLE ORANGE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 table­ spoons of the Seville Orange Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

STEP IT UP

  • For a fizzy variation on the classic Screwdriver, add 1 ounce of vodka to the soda recipe.
  • Make a version of this syrup to use in a classic orange phosphate by skipping the addition of the orange juice and adding a few drops of acid phosphate to the soda recipe.

3. LIME SYRUP

Citrus is the most common base for all sodas, so mastering a perfect lime or lemon syrup is a must for home soda makers. With a solid citrus soda in hand, branching out to mix syrups in the glass or even experimenting with extra flavors at the cooking stage is the next step. From that foundation, the creative possibilities grow exponentially.  I find a Microplane zester, which completely avoids the bitter white pith, is absolutely indispensable for making a perfect citrus syrup, Makes about 1 ½ cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ¼ cups water
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • Zest of 4 limes

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Add the zest and remove the pan from the heat. Steep for at least 1 hour. Let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

FRESH LIME SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Lime Syrup and the juice of half a lime. Top with seltzer and mix gently.

LEMON SYRUP

• Make a lemon syrup by substituting lemon zest for the lime.


4. MEYER LEMON SIRUP

Smooth-skinned, plump, and almost neon yellow, Meyer lemons are low in acid, floral in fragrance, and almost sweet, like oranges. Their light, honey­ like aroma makes this canary-colored treats a favorite of pastry chefs. MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ cups water
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup minus
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Zest of 4 Meyer lemons

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water, salt, and sugar to a boil. Add the zest and remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan and steep for 20 minutes. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

MEYER LEMON SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Meyer Lemon Syrup from Zest, the juice from half a Meyer lemon, and top with seltzer.

MEYER LEMON LACTART

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Meyer Lemon Syrup from Zest and 1 teaspoon lactic acid. Top with seltzer and mix gently.


5. GINGER SYRUP

A basic, must-have ingredient for the serious soda crafter, the ginger syrup is an excellent starter recipe. Stirred into a glass of icy seltzer, it makes a zingy, invigorating soda with just enough bite to be interesting. As a building block for more complicated drink blends, this syrup adds depth with its warm spice and clean citrus note.  For a more traditional ginger syrup  that will make classic ginger ale, omit the lemon zest, Makes about 1 ½ Cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 ounces fresh Unpeeled ginger (about the size of the first part of your thumb)
  • 1 cup of water
  • ¾ cup of sugar
  • 2 pieces lemon zest

PREPARATION

Wash the ginger well in hot water. Using a Micro plane zester, grate the ginger, carefully reserving the juice and pulp.

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a gentle boil. Add the ginger and lemon zest, and remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan and steep for about 45 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

GINGER ALE

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Ginger Syrup, 1 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


6. GUAVA SYRUP

Guava is a small fruit with a big flavor. Its fragrance is reminiscent of a lemon rind but more floral and less sharp. With a pulp that tastes like the offspring of a pear and a strawberry, its popularity in tropical locales around the globe is no surprise, Makes about 2 ½ Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds fresh guava
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 cup minus
  • 1tablespoon sugar

PREPARATION

Cut the guava into ½ inch slices, and put them into a heatproof bowl. Bring the water and sugar to a boil in a medium saucepan and carefully pour it over the guava slices. Using a potato masher, mash the guava thoroughly. Cover and let cool to room temperature. Refrigerate the guava overnight.

The following day, strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the fruit solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

GUAVA SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Guava Syrup, 1 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


7. PINEAPPLE SYRUP

The concentrated sweet, slightly tangy flavor of this pineapple syrup is a universal favorite.  Ripe pineapples organically balance the sweetness and tartness, so they’re a natural for cool, fresh sodas. The lemon juice tones down the sugar, making this treat a grown-up favorite, Makes about 2 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups fresh Pineapple juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • ¾ cup of sugar

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the pineapple juice, lemon juice, water, and sugar to a simmer, but not a rolling boil. Simmer until the sugar is dissolved, about 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

PINEAPPLE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Pineapple Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

STEP IT UP

• Add a shot of Myers’s Dark Rum to the basic soda recipe for a tropical cocktail.


8. SOUR CHERRY SIRUP

Since the fruit is tart and acidic, the taste for sour cherries right off the tree is an acquired one. When tamed with sweeteners, like sugar or honey, this fruit becomes natural for liqueurs, preserves, and syrups, Makes about 2 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 quarts fresh sour cherries, pitted
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • Juice of ½ lemon

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine the cherries, sugar, and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the fruit solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

STEP IT UP

  • For a deeper, more lush cherry flavor with more sweetness than bite, substitute sweet dark cherries for the sour cherries or try a mix of the two to suit your own taste preference.
  • Pour this syrup over a scoop of chocolate ice cream to mimic the flavor of chocolate-covered cherry cordials. Or stir it into milk for a Valentine’s Day breakfast treat.

9. POMEGRANATE SYRUP (AKA GRENADINE)

Why buy bottles of grenadine when it’s so easy to make at home, the natural way? This garnet-hued, sweetly piquant syrup is a great addition to any number of beverages for both its color and its flavor—and it makes a delicious soda on its own, too. Use high quality bottled pomegranate juice, or make your own using the tips (Below). Makes about 2 ½ Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 1 cup caster sugar
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

Combine the pomegranate juice, sugar, and salt in a tightly lidded container. Shake until the sugar is dissolved. Store in an airtight container for up to 14 days.

JUICING POMEGRANATES

Pomegranates are a little tricky, but fresh juice is hard to beat. Start by separating the seeds from the skin and pith: Cut the fruit in half crosswise. Hold one-half upside down over a large bowl, and using a heavy spoon, strike the back of the peel repeatedly. The seeds will pop out into the bowl. There are a few ways to juice this fruit:

  • Put the seeds in a zip-top bag and gently crush with a rolling pin. Be careful not to bear down too hard, as chemicals from the seeds could impart a bitter taste to the juice. Strain the mixture through a clean piece of cheesecloth or a coffee filter, and then discard the pulp.
  • Pulse the seeds in a conventional blender, and then strain as above.
  • Run the seeds through a food mill, discarding the pulp.
  • Instead of extracting the seeds, ream halves of the fruit on a citrus juicer, as you would a lemon.

HOW TO ZEST CITRUS

Mastering the skill of zesting citrus is key to making the finest soda syrups.

  1. Wash the fruit thoroughly.
  2. Cradle the fruit in your palm from end to end, so that one tip is near your pinkie and one tip is near your thumb, in order to expose the most zest.
  3. Prop the zester against a flat cutting board, holding it at a 45-degree angle.
  4. With one broad stroke, scrape the fruit against the zester from tip to tail while twisting your wrist. Grate shallowly to avoid the bitter white pith. With a larger fruit, you may not be able to zest the full strip at one time.
  5. Spin the fruit on an orbit, repeating the zesting motion, until the whole fruit is scraped clean of zest.

10. BLUEBERRY SYRUP

If you’re lucky enough to forage for your own berries, this recipe is an excellent way to make the most of your haul. But a summer trip to the farmer’s market or produce department will yield plenty of fresh pints for that bursting sweet taste that encapsulates the feeling of hot-weather picnics and the Fourth of July, Makes about 2 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ CUPS fresh Blueberries
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

PREPARATION

In a small saucepan set over medium heat, combine the blueberries, sugar, and lemon juice. Bring to a simmer slowly, stirring until all of the berries have popped, about 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, remove the mixture from the refrigerator. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

BLUEBERRY SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Blueberry Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


11. BASIL SYRUP

With its mild, peppery flavor and delicate menthol aroma, basil features prominently in Italian, Thai, and Vietnamese cuisine. Varieties include sweet basil, lemon basil, chocolate basil, pineapple basil, and the slightly astringent holy basil. Experiment to End out which one is your favorite for this herbal sweet syrup, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 ⅔ cups sugar
  • 25 large fresh basil leaves

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Add the basil leaves and cover the pan. Steep for 15 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the leaves, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

BASIL SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Basil Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

MINT SYRUP

  • Make the fresh mint syrup by substituting mint leaves for basil leaves.

STEP IT UP

  • Try drizzling the syrup over cubes of fresh cantaloupe for a refreshing snack or dessert.

12. ANISE HYSSOP SYRUP

Also known as licorice mint, the anise hyssop plant is technically neither. With its many culinary uses, it’s a great addition to a home garden, but beware: it reseeds itself and can take over very quickly. You can generally find it at farmer’s markets and upscale produce stores that carry a wide variety of herbs.

Sweet, rather than spicy to the taste, anise hyssop is a natural for desserts and soft drinks. I like using these flowers over fruit salad, for their unique taste that’s faintly reminiscent of licorice and lavender, and for their beauty. The plant’s leaves can be dried and used in tea, for a clean, palate-cleansing drink.  Anise hyssop makes a sophisticated soda, great to serve at celebrations in place of cocktails or wine, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 1 bunch fresh anise hyssop (reserve some of the flowers for garnish)

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Add the anise hyssop and cover the pan. Steep for 15 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the solids, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

ANISE HYSSOP SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Anise Hyssop Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently. Garnish with the reserved anise hyssop flowers.

STEP IT UP

  • An acid note is also a nice touch with the exotic herbal flavor of this drink. Try adding a few drops of lactic acid or lemon juice to the basic soda recipe.

13. LEMON VERBENA SYRUP

Some describe the flavor of lemon verbena as a cross between very subtle licorice and camphor. I love it for its lemony finish. Herbal and bright, it’s sometimes used in cooking as a replacement for oregano. As a soda flavor, lemon verbena is modern and crisp, with an herbal complexity. It’s great as a stand-alone drink for cocktail hour and as a complement to the light, simple meals, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1⅔ cups sugar
  • 20 to 30 large fresh lemon verbena leaves

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Add the lemon verbena leaves and cover the pan. Steep for 15 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the leaves, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

CHERRY VERBENA SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 1 tablespoon of the Lemon Verbena Syrup, 2 tablespoons of Sour Cherry Syrup, and a few dashes of acid phosphate or lemon juice or citric acid solution. Top with seltzer and mix gently. Garnish with lemon verbena leaves and maraschino cherries, if desired.

TELL ME ABOUT LEMON VERBENA

Sometimes called “The Queen of the Lemon Scented Herbs/lemon verbena was a favorite ingredient in perfumes in late 1700s Europe, and it had a moment of fame in Gone with the Wind, as it was Scarlett’s mother’s favorite plant. The leaver of lemon verbena is great in cooking, as they impart a lemony fragrance and flavor to dishes ranging from broiled fish to salad dressings, to light desserts. As a beverage, it is used to make herbal tea and is often added to black tea in place of lemon.


14. LEMONGRASS SYRUP

Commonly used in soups, teas, and curries, lemongrass both dried and fresh imparts a bright citrus flavor to dishes. The oil of the lemongrass plant acts as a preservative and is used widely in aromatherapy, owing to its heady perfume, Makes about 2 ½ Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 stalks lemongrass
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 1thick strip of lemon zest

PREPARATION

Wash the lemongrass, smash it with the butt end of a knife, and then thinly slice it. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, bring the water and sugar to a boil. Add the lemongrass and lemon zest, and remove the pan from the heat. Steep for 1 hour.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the solids, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 14 days.

GINGER LEMONGRASS SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 1 tablespoon of the Lemongrass Syrup, 1 tablespoon of Ginger Syrup (page 27), and the juice of half a lemon or lime, or a few drops of citric acid solution. Top with seltzer and mix gently.


15. CONCORD GRAPE SYRUP

Rich, jewel-colored, and fragrant, this syrup wows wine lovers and grape soda lovers alike. The highly aromatic Concord grape is a natural for juicing, with a flavor leaning toward candied strawberries and musk.  Even when mixed with seltzer, this syrup never tastes watered down, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 quarts fresh Concord grapes
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • Juice of ½ lemon

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine the grapes, sugar, and lemon juice and bring to a simmer. Cook for 30 minutes.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, discard the solids, and let cool. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

GRAPE PHOSPHATE

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Concord Grape Syrup and a few dashes of acid phosphate. Top with seltzer and mix gently.

THE CONCORD CRAPE, AN AMERICAN ORIGINAL

Hailing from the town of Concord, Massachusetts, the first Concord grape was cultivated in the mid-i8oos. Unlike many of its European ancestors, this robust grape thrives in the rugged New England soil and ripens early, allowing it to escape the early fall frosts. Prized for their pungent aroma and deep, jammy flavor, the dark purple-skinned grapes are the most popular variety sold in the United States.


16. HUCKLEBERRY SYRUP

Huckleberries are not commercially cultivated, so devotees will have to find them in the wild or purchase them from a forager.  Often confused with blueberries, these purple-black beauties are decidedly tarter and have a more complex flavor than their cousins. “Imagine eating wildness,” rhapsodizes  Asta Bowen in her 1998 handbook The Huckleberry Book. For a soda that tastes of all the freshness nature has to offer, you can’t go wrong choosing the huckleberry as a base, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups fresh huckleberries
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a small saucepan set over medium heat, combine the berries, sugar, water, lemon juice, and salt. Slowly bring the mixture to a simmer, stirring until all of the berries have popped, about 5 minutes (You can also mash with a potato masher). Remove the pan from the heat and let cool. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

HUCKLEBERRY SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 table­ spoons of the Huckleberry Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

ELDERBERRY SYRUP

  • In sharp contrast to the complicated, full-bodied taste of the huckleberry is the lighter, more subtle taste of elderberry. The elderberry’s delicate flavor is floral and fruity at the same time, reminiscent of the lychee’s. The components of the elderberry tree (Sambucus nigras) are used to flavor elderflower cordial, the Italian liqueur Sambuca, and the French liqueur St-Germain. It even plays a key role in Fanta’s Shokata soft drink. The berries are used in pies, marmalade, relishes, and now, soda.
  • To make elderberry syrup, prepare the Huckleberry Syrup recipe, substituting elderberries for huckleberries. For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the elderberry syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.

17. CRANBERRY SPICE SYRUP

This is a special flavor I perfected for my friends Harry and Taylor at The Brooklyn  Kitchen,  where I teach my soda-making class.  The mixture of fresh and dried berries balances the flavor notes of this syrup: the fresh berries lend a sun-kissed brightness while the dried berries ground it with deep,  dark tones—rich and perfect for the winter holiday season. MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup fresh cranberries (about 3 ounces)
  • ¾ cup dried cranberries (about 2 ounces)
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 2 pieces of orange zest
  • 2 coin-size slices of fresh ginger
  • 6 allspice berries
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 whole cloves
  • Pinch of salt

PREPARATION

In a medium saucepan set over low heat, combine the fresh and dried cranberries, water, sugar, zest, ginger, allspice, cinnamon stick, cloves, and salt. Cook until the cranberries burst, about 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool.

Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer and discard the solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

CRANBERRY SPICE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Cranberry Spice Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


18. QUINCE SIRUP

A unique fruit, the quince has a floral fragrance and pear-like shape. A sacred symbol of Aphrodite, the quince was used as a breath-freshener by brides in ancient Greece, who would nibble on the fruit to perfume their kisses.

Don’t waste the cooked fruit pulp after you’ve strained out the syrup! Puree it in a food processor until it’s soft like jam and use it as a spread to pair with Manchego cheese, a Spanish variety made With sheep’s milk, or salty Greek Mizithra cheese, which is a lot like feta, but firmer. For more texture, serve alongside almonds or walnuts, Makes about 3 Cups.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 large quinces
  • 6 cups of water
  • 2 ½ cups sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 (2-inch-long) strip of lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon salt

PREPARATION

Wash the quinces thoroughly with warm water, rubbing them to remove the fuzz. Peel the quinces, cut in half, and remove the core and seeds. Dice the fruit into large pieces, and put in a medium sauce­ pan with the water, sugar, lemon juice and zest, and salt. Set the pan over medium heat and bring the mixture to a simmer. Cover and cook for 3 hours, or until the liquid is a dark auburn color. Strain the syrup through a fine-mesh strainer, reserving the fruit for another use. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

QUINCE SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Quince Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


19. BANANA SYRUP

Sweet, spicy, and full-bodied, this syrup reminds me of stacks of pancakes, French toast dusted with sugar, and pudding. The coconut sugar lends a nice touch of tropical essence, as well as a depth of flavor that you can’t get from any other sugar. You can find coconut sugar in the natural-foods section of most large grocery stores, Makes about 1 Cup.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ cups caster sugar
  • 2 tablespoons maple sugar
  • 2 tablespoons coconut sugar
  • 4 large bananas, peeled
  • Juice of ½ lemon

PREPARATION

In a medium bowl, combine the sugars. Slice the bananas into ¼ inch rounds, and then toss the pieces in the sugar mixture, coating them thoroughly. Add the lemon juice, toss well, and transfer to an airtight container. Store the mixture in the refrigerator for 2 days.

After 2 days, strain the mixture through a colander, pressing on the banana solids to extract the liquid. Discard the banana solids. Store the syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

BANANA SODA

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the Banana Syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently.


20. EIGHT-HOUR METER LEMONS IN SYRUP

Urbane, clean, and with a mild bitter finish, this syrup makes a one-of-a-kind base for a soda or a cocktail. I really enjoy the balance of sweet and bitter flavors that develops from slowly cooking a blend of peel and whole fruit. MAKES ONE 16-OUNCE JAR.

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 Meyer lemons
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

PREPARATION

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile, wash the lemons and slice them into ⅛-inch-thick rounds. Remove the seeds.

Combine the sugar and salt in a large bowl, add the lemon slices, and toss well. Arrange the lemon slices in layers in a sterilized, wide-mouthed 16-ounce canning jar, sprinkling any extra salt and sugar mixture between the layers. Cover the jar with its lid, put it in the pot of boiling water, and reduce the heat until the water is simmering. Simmer in the water bath at about 200°F (use a candy thermometer) for 8 hours. If need be, add a little water to the pot as it boils off.

Carefully remove the jar from the pot and let cool completely on the counter. The lemons will keep in the refrigerator, unopened, for several months. Once the jar has been opened, the lemons will keep for up to 14 days.

BITTER LEMON SODA

This lemon soda has a dry, slightly bitter taste that reminds me of European soft drinks like Chinotto, Sanbitter, and Bitter Kas. Modern and cosmopolitan, it’s definitely not your grandmother’s lemonade!

For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the syrup from the top of the cooked lemons with seltzer, and mix gently.


21. CANDIED KUMQUATS IN SYRUP

Available in two varieties, round and oval, the kumquat is considered a symbol of good luck in many Asian cultures and is often given as a gift during the Lunar New Year. Popular as a houseplant, its branches are inclined to be groomed for bonsai.

In cultures where the kumquat is popular, the raw fruit is sometimes eaten whole, the contrast of the sweet peel and the tart fruit being a prized, albeit acquired, taste.

Because of their delicate hue, kumquats have become popular in the West, sliced in green salads and as a cocktail garnish.  When the kumquat is preserved with sugar in relishes,  marmalades,  beverage syrups,  and as candied fruit,  its tart nature is toned and tamed,  and the floral fragrance shines as a winning trait, Makes one 8-ounce jar.

INGREDIENTS

  • ¾ Cup kumquats
  • Pinch of salt
  • ⅓ Cup sugar
  • ⅓ Cup water

PREPARATION

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile, put the kumquats in a medium saucepan, cover with water, and add the salt. Set the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and strain the mixture through a colander, discarding the water. Put the kumquats back into the saucepan and cover with water. Bring the kumquats back to a boil and repeat the process, blanching the fruit a total of three times to help remove some of the bitterness.

After the final blanching, put the fruit in a sterilized, wide-mouthed 8-ounce canning jar, and add the sugar and ⅓ cup water. Cover the jar with its lid, put it in the pot of boiling water, and reduce the heat until the water is simmering. Simmer in the water bath at i9O°F (use a candy thermometer) for 2 hours, or until the kumquats start to look translucent. Avoid a rolling boil, or the kumquats will burst. Add a little water to the pot as it boils off.

Carefully remove the jar from the pot and let cool completely on the counter. The kumquats will keep in the refrigerator, unopened, for several months. Once the jar has been opened, the kumquats will keep for up to 14 days.

KUMQUAT SODA

The syrup from the Candied Kumquats has an amazing tart, sour-orange flavor with just enough sweetness. For one drink, fill a tall glass with ice. Add 3 tablespoons of the syrup, top with seltzer, and mix gently. Garnish with some slices of the Candied Kumquats.

Related: